Boxty

Last week, my daughter did a project for school based on “The Olden Days”.  Part of the project involved interviewing her grandparents about life when they were children, what their houses were like, about their schools and Christmas time.

We went looking through Nanny and Grandad’s old photo albums for photographs of when they were younger, which we copied and stuck into the project.  We also put in a picture of an old recipe book (which we still use today and I will write a post on sometime in the future).  While we were doing all this one night last week, we had the brain wave that we would ask my Mum to help us make Boxty and we’d photograph it then stick the recipe and pictures into the project as well to show a recipe that my Grandmother made from time to time when her own children were small.  Her children loved Boxty so much that they continued to make it themselves when they had families of their own, and now some of the Grandchildren make it too.  So it’s something that’s been passed all the way down the line of our family.

There are many different ways to make boxty, but this is the way we do it:

What you need:

1lb Potatoes Grated

2 Cups Flour

Splash of Milk

Pinch of Salt

Olive oil to fry

Method:

Peel and grate potatoes.  Years ago, my Grandmother would have used a hand grater but today we use a food processor.  It’s a lot easier on the fingers!  Put the potatoes in a large mixing bowl.

Add the flour and milk and mix well, (it should resemble porridge).  Add a small pinch of salt.

Heat a little olive oil in a frying pan.  Spoon a little mixture onto a small side plate to measure the amount you need then add to the frying pan.

Spread out the mixture so it is flat like a pancake.  Fry for a couple of minutes, until golden on one side then flip it over and fry the other side.

Spread a little butter on the Boxty to serve.

It is gorgeous eaten straight from the pan, but we love Boxty re-fried on the pan the next day as it is much crispier (that’s if it lasts that long!)

4 comments

  1. sharon says:

    I love the idea of recipes being passed down through the generations. Recently I heard that when a person dies in Thailand, they often make a little book in commemoration of them (I’m imagining something like the memorial cards we have here) and this book often contains their favourite recipes. I love that idea!

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